Are lefties better at sports?

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Racquetball Vs. Squash

Racquetball and squash have many similarities at first glance, such as both games are played with rackets on enclosed courts. However, the sports are actually quite different in the way they are played. Because the ball bounces higher and can hit any surface, racquetball’s pace is faster. Racket and ball size are two of the other biggest differences.
Squash was invented in 1830 by the students at Harrow School in England as a variation on a game called “rackets.” They discovered that when you toss a punctured ball against the wall — or “squashed” it — it bounced back in a variety of different ways to make a more challenging game. Racquetball had a similar beginning, just much later. In 1949, Joe Sobek of Connecticut was a bit bored of his indoor sports options, so he combined his love of tennis and handball into racquetball. He created a prototype for a racket, and the game took off like crazy in the 1970s and 80s.
The rackets for both were once made of wood, but now feature composite materials or metals like graphite or titanium. Squash rackets measure up to 27 inches long, 5 inches more than the maximum for racquetball. Squash rackets once had circular heads and looked like badminton rackets, but, beginning in the 1980s, they took on a tear-drop shape similar to racquetball rackets. The head is still wider for racquetball. Squash balls measure 4 cm in diameter. The rubber racquetball balls are close to 6 cm in diameter and bounce much higher than squash balls.
Both courts are enclosed, but the playing surface and size are different. The racquetball court measures 20 by 40 by 20 feet; a squash court is 21 by 32 by 15 feet. Every surface, including the ceiling, is considered in bounds in racquetball, while you’re not permitted to hit the ceiling in squash. There are also boundary lines along the front and back walls of a squash court, in addition to diagonal boundary lines on the side walls. In addition, a 19-inch high tin strip is out-of-bounds at the base of the front wall.
A squash player is only allowed one serve at the start of each point, while racquetball players, like tennis, are permitted two. In squash, you hit the ball while it’s airborne, without letting it bounce first. In racquetball, you must bounce the ball before hitting it. For racquetball, your serve can hit any part of the front wall and then land behind what’s called the “short line.” In squash, the server must get the ball into one of two alternating serving boxes, and the ball must land above the tin line yet below the service line to be good.
In both sports, you must win by two points — squash goes to nine points in regular play and 11 in tournament play. Racquetball games go to 15 points, but you can only earn points on your serve. As in tennis, a squash player wins a point if he wins a rally regardless of who served. A return is good if it’s above the tin line and below the out line, without bouncing twice on the floor. In racquetball, you also can’t let the ball bounce twice, but it must hit the front wall before touching the floor. In squash, you must win three games to claim the match; in racquetball you only need to win two.

5 Tips for Coaching Pop Warner Cheerleading

Sports teams thrive on the enthusiasm of their fans in the stands. You know just how powerful home field advantage can be in sports. This refers to the phenomenon of how teams generally do better when they’re in their own field, surrounded by their own fans. (However, some evidence suggests that this has more to do with discouraging the visiting team than encouraging the home team — but whatever works, right?) Cheerleaders play a pivotal part in keeping the fans excited and supportive, and it’s developed into a competitive sport in its own right.
Youth cheerleading is a great way to get kids involved in a physical group activity. Whether or not kids stay involved with the sport through high school or college, they still benefit from the exercise, discipline and social activities. And just as cheerleaders lead crowds, the coach has responsibility for leading the cheer squad, ensuring activities are safe, productive and fun.
Coaching a Pop Warner cheer team is one way to help these kids benefit from the activities. Pop Warner Little Scholars, Inc., is the nation’s largest and oldest youth football and cheerleading organization. It allows kids age 5 to 16 the opportunity to take part in cheering on the sidelines and competing in national championships.
However, coaching can be harder than it looks. If you’re charged with the task of coaching a Pop Warner cheer team, you’ll want to take heed of some tips first.

David and Linda’s Salmon Sliders with Aioli Sauce

Try this great recipe from the football fans and players on TLC’s Kick Off Cook Off.
See more recipes from TLC’s KICK OFF COOK OFF, a new cooking competition that slams together America’s two favorite pastimes: football and cooking!
Check out more recipes for Seafood

What is folklore?

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How the NFL Pro Bowl Works

The anticipation of football season is electric. Its preamble happens in waves. First comes the NFL Draft — a well-publicized three-day celebration of “What If,” as the leagues’ newest members give fans reason to dream of a successful season in the fall. Then there’s training camp, offering the first glimpse of the new-look teams. The preseason begins, and this very closely resembles actual football except for the second- and third-stringers that find their way into the lineups. Finally, the fantasy football drafts happen and office betting pools begin to form. No other sport builds up to the season the way football does.
Of the four major American professional sports organizations, the National Football League in the past two decades has risen above Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League in the two areas that matter the most — revenues and the all-important game attendance.
On average, each NFL game during the 2009 season drew 67,509 fans [source: Harris]. Compare that to baseball, which attracted an average of 30,338 fans per game during the same season, and it’s easy to see why the National Pastime seems to be shifting from the diamond to the gridiron [source: Harris]. That’s not exactly an apples-to-apples comparison considering the disparity in the lengths of each sport’s seasons. Because MLB plays so many more games, even with half-empty stadiums the sport plays to more than 70 million spectators in a given year. The NFL can’t come close to matching that, with a total of just over 17 million taking in games in 2009. Despite such a large gap in ticket sales, the NFL still earned a cool billion dollars more than MLB in 2009 [source: Trowbridge].
The NFL stands head and shoulders above other professional sports, but it has one weakness when compared to its counterparts — the Pro Bowl. Of all the major all-star games, the Pro Bowl is the only one that actually draws a smaller audience than regular-season games [source: Fletcher].
In this article, we’ll discuss how the Pro Bowl works, who gets to play and what factors contribute to this being such an anticlimactic end to sports’ most intense season.

How Long Until a Chipped Bone on the Knee From Playing Football Heals?

Football is a high-impact sport that can take its toll on your body. Sprinting, sudden starts and stops and direct collisions can lead to injuries of the knees. Chipped bones in your knee often result from a previous injury that causes bone or cartilage pieces to chip off. This condition is known as osteochondritis dissecans, and it should be treated by a physician to promote proper healing. A chipped bone in the knee can take weeks or months to heal, according to Cedars Sinai Orthopaedic Center.
Osteochondritis dissecans occurs most often in young men, especially those who have sustained prior joint injuries, according to the Mayo Clinic. When pieces of bone or cartilage chip from the knee, the fragment may become jammed between the moving portions of your knee joint. This can lead to pain, especially during sports and star climbing. If you have osteochondritis dissecans, you also might notice joint locking or popping as you move. Your knee joint may feel weak, have a limited range of motion or appear swollen and tender. Some individuals with this condition may never experience symptoms.
If you experience persistent knee pain, see a physician and discontinue football until he says otherwise. the doctor will perform a physical examination and review your medical history. Your doctor might take X-rays of your knee to rule out other conditions. Further imaging studies, such as CT scans or MRIs, may provide a more detailed view of your knee joint to help your doctor determine where chipped bone is present and what he needs to do to treat your condition.
The goal of treatment of osteochondritis dissecans is to restore normal function of your knee and to reduce pain. Docs generally try conservative measures first to relieve your pain. Your doctor may recommend avoiding high-impact physical activities such as football and participation in low-impact exercise, such as swimming or using an elliptical machine. You may also be required to use crutches to allow your knee to rest. Physical therapy might help increase strength and range of motion in your knee joint. If conservative treatment fails, surgery might be necessary to remove bone chips.
The recovery time for treatment for osteochondritis dissecans largely depends on the type of treatment used. Cedars Sinai Orthopaedic Center indicates that competitive sports and physical activities should be avoided for six to eight weeks. During this time, a knee brace or crutches may be used. If after three to six months of conservative treatment, your doctor may recommend surgery. Surgery may be performed by completely opening the knee or with arthroscopic surgery. The recovery time for arthroscopic surgery tends to be shorter than having opened knee surgery. Only your doctor can provide you with an exact recovery time from surgery based on the severity of your condition and how well your body handles surgery and rehabilitation.
Your return to football largely depends on your pain level, as well as the type of treatment you received. Ultimately, you and your doctor will make the decision. You should not return to football until you have regained strength in your knee and are able to run and spring without limping. Your knee should not be swollen or tender. You should be able to jump without pain, cut back and forth on the football field and run figure-eights without experiencing pain.

How Knights Work

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1940 Packard One Eighty

There was no place for Dutch Darrin, customizer of the 1940 Packard One Eighty, to go but home.
After 15 glorious years of designing exclusive full-custom automobile bodies in Paris — first in partnership with fellow American Thomas Hibbard, then with a banker named Fernandez — he sensed the day of such highly individualized motor cars was passing. So, in 1937, Howard Addi?son Darrin, born 40 years earlier in Cranford, New Jersey, forsook the “City of Lights” for the “City of Angels.”
Darrin set up in Holly?wood, there to fashion customized variations of production cars he felt would appeal primarily to the free-spending film community. One of his early ideas was to cut the roof off of a “junior” Packard Eight/One Twenty coupe, replace it with a convertible top, and lower the hoodline.
This he did several times for a client list that would have made for quite a fine credit roll at the end of a Tinseltown blockbuster. Then the Packard Motor Car Com?pany, that proper bastion of luxury-class motoring located in hard-working Detroit, got wind of what Dutch Darrin was doing in sun-drenched, fun-loving California.
Packard management elected to give its sanction to Darrin’s efforts, carrying the custom models (which also included a four-door convertible and a notchback four-door sedan) in its 1940 catalog and placing a chrome script of Darrin’s signature on the cars.
But there were conditions. Dutch favored the One Twenty for being light and easy to modify, but the company wanted him to build most of the cars on the Custom Super Eight (or One Eighty) chassis. The $4,593 Convertible Victoria, as the two-door soft top was billed, rode a 127-inch wheelbase.
Aside from sectioning the hood and radiator shell to lower its profile, the Vic?toria had cut-down doors. Despite the “roadster” look of its thin windshield frame, it was a true convertible with roll-up side windows. The Darrins were the first Packards without running boards. Initially built in the former Auburn body plant in Indi?ana, production later shifted to Ohio funeral-car builder Sayers & Scoville. Victorias were made until 1942.
The restored 1940 Darrin Victoria featured here is owned by David Miller, of Orange, California. It is powered by a 356-cubic-inch L-head straight-eight engine. The powerplant’s 160 horsepower are driven through a three-speed transmission with overdrive.