What’s the difference between wet and dry barbecue?

Some cities and regions are inextricably linked with the local cuisine. When you visit your old college roommate in Chicago, she takes you out for deep-dish pizza. Your cousins in Philadelphia treat you to Philly cheesesteak sandwiches when you drop in for the weekend. And when you spend the holidays with your grandparents in Memphis, Tenn., you’re in store for a lot of barbecue.
Despite barbecue’s association with the Deep South, it’s actually more Caribbean than Southern. The word “barbecue” comes from the Spanish barbacoa or the French babracot, both of which were picked up from the Taino and Arawak tribes of Haiti and Guiana [source: Steingarten]. Both of these terms refer to a way of preparing meat by draping it across moist wood until it dries out over a fire. Barbecue expert Steven Raichlen proposes that this method of cooking is almost as old as humankind. Our prehistoric ancestors eventually figured out they could use fire to cook, perhaps after they observed a wildfire engulf and char a wild animal [source: National Barbecue Association].
The way we barbecue today isn’t too different. Esteemed food critic Jeffrey Steingarten explains that “real barbecue” (as distinguished from grilling) involves cooking meat in an “enclosed,” humid space under low, constant temperatures (usually around 175 to 250 degrees Fahrenheit or 79.4 to 121 degrees Celsius). This ensures that the meat’s fat and connective tissue dissolve and that the meat virtually falls off the bone when it’s done — and when it’s finished cooking, it’s well-done. Barbecue is never served rare.
When you’re visiting your friends in the South, a few topics are sure to get people heated: SEC Football and barbecue. Often, the debate about barbecue is whether wet or dry is better. What exactly is the difference? Kell Phelps, publisher of The National Barbecue News, says, “It’s real simple: Dry is without sauce, wet is with sauce.” And the region where you’re dining influences the fare. Phelps says that the regional preference in Memphis is typically a dry barbecue with sauce on the side; in Kansas City and North Carolina, people like their barbecue wet (with even more sauce on the side).
But dry barbecue isn’t lacking in taste just because it’s not smothered in sauce. Danny Williamson, Georgia restaurateur and co-owner of Williamson Bros. Bar-B-Q, explains that it’s cooked with a flavorful dry rub. At his restaurant, dry barbecue is smoked, while the wet variety is cooked in a hickory fire pit.
Barbecue preference is largely dictated by whether you like saucy or seasoned meat, as well as the cut of meat you favor. The pig’s shoulder is typically used for wet barbecue, while the ribs are reserved for the dry kind. Wet barbecue takes about six to eight hours to cook (it’s a denser hunk of meat); dry barbecue can be smoked in as few as two hours.
As they say, the secret is in the sauce. Or the rub. Williamson, who says “Barbecue is defined by the sauce,” isn’t giving away any family secrets. However, he shares that most Southern sauces are composed of a tomato and vinegar base. Signature South Carolina sauces start with yellow mustard, Phelps says. Dry rubs are made up of plenty of brown sugar, salt and pepper. In fact, rubs are typically worked into the meat the night before it’s cooked so that the salt can penetrate the cut and tenderize it [source: Lewis]. But rubs do more than flavor and soften the meat; they also enhance its texture by caramelizing and forming a crispy crust when cooked. Because of the rub’s ability to penetrate the meat, fatty cuts like brisket respond well to this type of seasoning.
Next time your Southern friends take you out for barbecue, you’ll be ready to order. Even if it’s a hard decision to make: savory seasoned ribs or shredded saucy pork? Your decision might be influenced by the sides and whether there’s a quality bun to sop up that sauce.
Barbecue refers to a cooking method and not a particular type of meat, but people use the term to describe the goods as well. In the Southwest, barbecue typically means barbecued beef, and in the South, it’s barbecued pork. However, you can also barbecue fish, chicken, tofu and root vegetables.

Drills for Football Players to Make Them More Aggressive

Being aggressive in football is a sought-after quality in a player, because it means that the player has what it takes to make contact with another player without fear. It means the player will not hesitate and lose valuable reaction time even if he knows contact is imminent. This is not to be confused with playing with anger or reckless abandon. Aggression must be confined within the rules of the game, or it can cost you severely in late-hit and roughing the passer penalties.
The Oklahoma drill seeks to teach aggressive run blocking for offensive players and aggressive block shedding by defensive players. It also teaches the running back to aggressively cut and make moves to store at the goal line. The drill will pit wide receivers against defensive backs, o-lineman against d-lineman, running backs against linebackers and tight ends against any of the three defensive specialties. Two cones are spaced three to five yards apart forming a horizontal line parallel to the end zone. The distance between those two parallel lines is three yards. The quarterback will hand the ball off to the running back, who will attempt to run between the cones and score a touchdown. The opposing offensive and defensive players will either attempt to open running room for the back, on offense, or shed the block and tackle the back, on defense. The two competing players will battle for leverage and position to make their desired play.
This drill is designed to teach offensive lineman to protect the quarterback at all costs and train the defensive lineman to elude the protection efforts of the offensive player. The offensive center, guard or tackle will line up at their position respective to the ¡°quarterback,¡± which may be either a live quarterback or a tackling dummy, and the defensive lineman will choose his stance based on the offensive player they are competing against and the technique they are working. For example, a defensive lineman may shade left or right of the edge of the lineman to work various hand techniques and swim maneuvers. The quarterback lines up five to seven yards from the center¡¯s typical position. The quarterback will ¡°hike¡± the ball, signaling the offensive and defensive lineman to compete to either protect or tackle the quarterback. If a live quarterback is present, a defensive lineman typically just two-hand touches the quarterback to prevent injury. If a tackling dummy is present, the defender should attempt to tackle the dummy to the ground.
This drill will effectively teach a running back to secure the football when running through defenders on the field. Players form two parallel lines about two to three yards apart with four players in each line. The running back lines up five yards away and in a direct path between the two lines. The quarterback hands the ball off to the running back, who will secure the football and sprint between the two lines. The running back¡¯s shoulder cradles the ball high and tight, with two fingers ¡°clawing¡± the point of the football with the middle of the ball wedged in between his forearm and bicep. The players in the two lines swat at the ball as the running back runs through. Their goal is to knock the ball loose.

Drills for Football Players to Make Them More Aggressive

Being aggressive in football is a sought-after quality in a player, because it means that the player has what it takes to make contact with another player without fear. It means the player will not hesitate and lose valuable reaction time even if he knows contact is imminent. This is not to be confused with playing with anger or reckless abandon. Aggression must be confined within the rules of the game, or it can cost you severely in late-hit and roughing the passer penalties.
The Oklahoma drill seeks to teach aggressive run blocking for offensive players and aggressive block shedding by defensive players. It also teaches the running back to aggressively cut and make moves to store at the goal line. The drill will pit wide receivers against defensive backs, o-lineman against d-lineman, running backs against linebackers and tight ends against any of the three defensive specialties. Two cones are spaced three to five yards apart forming a horizontal line parallel to the end zone. The distance between those two parallel lines is three yards. The quarterback will hand the ball off to the running back, who will attempt to run between the cones and score a touchdown. The opposing offensive and defensive players will either attempt to open running room for the back, on offense, or shed the block and tackle the back, on defense. The two competing players will battle for leverage and position to make their desired play.
This drill is designed to teach offensive lineman to protect the quarterback at all costs and train the defensive lineman to elude the protection efforts of the offensive player. The offensive center, guard or tackle will line up at their position respective to the ¡°quarterback,¡± which may be either a live quarterback or a tackling dummy, and the defensive lineman will choose his stance based on the offensive player they are competing against and the technique they are working. For example, a defensive lineman may shade left or right of the edge of the lineman to work various hand techniques and swim maneuvers. The quarterback lines up five to seven yards from the center¡¯s typical position. The quarterback will ¡°hike¡± the ball, signaling the offensive and defensive lineman to compete to either protect or tackle the quarterback. If a live quarterback is present, a defensive lineman typically just two-hand touches the quarterback to prevent injury. If a tackling dummy is present, the defender should attempt to tackle the dummy to the ground.
This drill will effectively teach a running back to secure the football when running through defenders on the field. Players form two parallel lines about two to three yards apart with four players in each line. The running back lines up five yards away and in a direct path between the two lines. The quarterback hands the ball off to the running back, who will secure the football and sprint between the two lines. The running back¡¯s shoulder cradles the ball high and tight, with two fingers ¡°clawing¡± the point of the football with the middle of the ball wedged in between his forearm and bicep. The players in the two lines swat at the ball as the running back runs through. Their goal is to knock the ball loose.

Family Vacations: College Football Hall of Fame

South Bend, Indiana, with a population just over 107,000, probably would have remained an ordinary college town were it not for Notre Dame’s Fighting Irish football team and the countless legends it has engendered. Thus, it seemed logical when the College Football Hall of Fame moved from Ohio to the downtown district of South Bend in 1995. The Hall of Fame today is highlighted by an unusual architecture of ramps, spirals, and tunnels. The main museum hall is underground.
Visitors wind around a giant circular staircase to visit the Hall of Honor. They then branch out to exhibits such as the Great Moments Kiosk and the Pantheon, which showcases recipients of especially prestigious awards, equipment displays, a strategy clinic, and a practice field where visitors can pass, block, and kick. The Pantheon’s centerpiece is the Stadium Theater, a re-creation of a live football game that makes visitors feel as if they are on a stadium field among the players, cheerleaders, and 106,000 screaming college football fans.
The first Hall of Fame inductees were selected in 1951. Among the original 54 legends inducted were Walter Camp, Jim Thorpe and Red Grange. Today, more than 900 college football players and coaches are enshrined.
College Football Hall of Fame Information
Address: 111 South St. Joseph St
South Bend, IN
Telephone: 574/235-9999, 800/440-FAME
Admission: $11 adults; $8 kids
To learn more about family vacation destinations, see:

How NFL Review Rules Work

The final seconds of the game — the quarterback throws to the end zone: touchdown! No, the official is ruling the receiver was out of bounds. Now comes the agonizing wait while the play is reviewed.
This scenario has become a common feature of NFL football. It’s made possible by the review rules, also known as the instant replay rules. The rules give the officials on the field another set of eyes to get calls right. With high definition and super slo-mo, those eyes are often much keener than those of any official or fan.
Review rules have sometimes generated controversy. Some fans and team owners prefer to keep the human factor in the game. Officiating errors are part of the history and lore of the league, they argued. Others felt that reviews slowed the game too much, especially for fans sitting in Buffalo’s icy Ralph Wilson Stadium in December.
The rules have their origin in the invention of television instant replay, which was first used in the broadcast of the 1963 Army-Navy football game [source: Starkey]. Once fans at home had access to replays, bad calls by the officials became embarrassingly obvious. The league was pressured to use the replay tool to get them right.
But the first review rules didn’t come into effect until 1986. They put the decision to review under the complete control of a video-review official in the booth. Many thought the system was arbitrary and took too much time. It was abandoned in 1992 [source: Long].
After several disputed calls during the 1998 season, revised review rules returned in 1999. The new rules gave coaches the power to call for a review for most of game. They assigned the referee, not an assistant in the booth, the duty of making the decision. These rules were renewed with minor revisions until 2007, when the league made them permanent [source: Associated Press].
But not all plays are reviewable. Read on to find out which are, and which are not.

10 Reasons Why Soccer Is Better Than Football

For many kids in the United States, playing football is a natural choice as far as a team sport. But for millions of players across the globe, soccer is the better option.
Soccer is the most popular sport in the world in terms of player numbers. According to the 2006 FIFA Big Count, there were 265 million soccer players in the world, 270 million when referees and match officials were included.
With so many registered soccer players across the globe, it’s not surprising that soccer has more fans worldwide than any other sport. If you want to become a globally recognized sport star, soccer is a better option than football.
Soccer players don’t need to spend large amounts of money on equipment. The two most costly items are soccer cleats and a ball, and neither need be overly expensive. A jersey, shorts and shin guards are the only other requirements. Football players must buy a large number of protective items for competitive play.
Football is a stop-start game with frequent pauses between each play. Soccer is a more fluid sport, an aspect that appeals to many fans and players.
It doesn’t take long to learn the basics of soccer. The rules are straightforward and easily defined, with only a few regulations — such as the offside rule, leaving much room for confusion. Football is a more complex sport in terms of set plays and regulations.
Soccer players don’t need the physical strength of football players. Athleticism and fitness are important, but you don’t need to be physically imposing to play soccer. Some of the world¡¯s top players, such as Lionel Messi, rely purely on skill and creativity rather than strength and stature. This makes soccer a more inclusive sport than football, for men and women.
If you dream of being an Olympic athlete, football is not the sport for you. Though football was featured in the 1932 Summer Olympics as a demonstration event, the International Olympic Committee has yet to accept football as an Olympic sport. Soccer has been a regular feature of the Olympics since 1900.
Soccer has a truly global reach; football is largely contained within North America. Soccer is like an international language that crosses cultural barriers, allowing you to share your love for the game with other fans throughout the world. Whether you are in Brazil, Burundi, Belgium or Bangkok, you find people with a common interest in soccer.
Soccer provides more opportunities to compete internationally, at amateur and professional levels. Youth teams often go on tour abroad, and individual players can train in soccer camps across the world. At the highest level, soccer also gives you the chance to represent your national team against all other nations on the planet, something that football does not offer in any comparable way.
Soccer players are less prone to injuries than football players, according to the 2006 High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The one-year study found that football players had the highest injury rate, with 4.36 injuries per 1,000 athlete exposures. Male and female soccer players had a rate of 2.43 and 2.36, respectively.

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The Ultimate Strange Tourist Attractions Quiz

Most tourist have attractions such as the Statue of Liberty, the Grand Canyon or Disney World on their to-do list while traveling around North America. But there are many stranger tourist sites that capture the attention of thousands of curious travelers each year. You man not have heard of some of them, but these strange and wonderful attractions help to put their hometowns on the map and boost the local economy. Take this quiz to learn more about some of the weirdest tourist attractions.

A Foot and Ankle Sprain

A sprain occurs when there is damage to a ligament. This differs from a strain, which is an injury to a muscle or tendon. Ligaments are tissues that connect bone to bone and support movement by stabilizing the joint. The main job of ligaments is to tighten to prevent a joint from hyperextending or moving in a direction that would cause injury. Several ligaments are found in the foot and ankle, which can become sprained. To hep manage this injury, it is important to understand the common causes of sprains and what steps can be taken to prevent and treat them.
A sprain is diagnosed when a ligament is stretched beyond its capacity and/or develops a partial or complete tear. Sprains can happen anywhere in the body but are most common in the ankle joint, states MayoClinic.com. Sprains are classified into three types. A level one is a minor injury during which the ligament is pulled or stretched too far. A level two or moderate sprain occurs when some of the ligament fibers have torn. A grade three sprain is severe and is diagnosed when there is a complete tear of the ligament.
A foot or ankle sprain results when the foot or ankle twists, rolls in or out or is forced into an abnormal position. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons claims that this can happen while walking on an uneven surface, from landing incorrectly while participating in high impact sports, after a fall or it can be the result of a blow to the foot or ankle. If high arches or flat feet exists or there is a tendency to pronate (roll outward) or supinate (roll inward), the risk for developing a sprain in the ankle or foot rises.
The symptoms experienced with a sprain of the foot and ankle depend on the severity of the sprain. Because a minor sprain left untreated can become more severe, it is important to seek treatment at the first sign of symptoms. The Family Doctor website recommends being on the lookout for foot or ankle pain. The area may be tender to the touch, stiff or show signs of swelling. At first these symptoms may just occur during activity but if left untreated they may eventually be present even at rest. More severe sprains will cause skin discoloration or bruising, and the foot or ankle may feel cold and become numb. With severe sprains it may not be possible to bear weight on the affected foot and ankle, and the pain is usually significant.
Severe sprains may require surgery to repair or reattach the ligament. Minor sprains will often heal on their own in a week or two if the proper steps are taken, states the Aetna InteliHealth website. This includes resting the area and avoiding activities that make symptoms worse until the pain subsides. Using ice and elevating the foot and ankle will help to control any swelling and inflammation. It will be important to return to activities slowly and discontinue or back off activities that cause symptoms to flare up. Moderate sprains may also call for pain and anti-inflammatory medications or steroid injections if oral medication is not enough. In some cases wrapping the area, wearing a cast or using crutches may be necessary. Moderate and severe sprains can take months to heal so the best bet is to start treatment early to avoid complications when possible.
After an ankle or foot sprain heals, it is important to take steps to prevent this injury from occurring again. If flat feet, high arches or a tendency to pronate or supinate exists, talking with a podiatrist can help. A podiatrist can evaluate movement patterns as well as the structure of the foot. If necessary inserts or orthodics can be prescribed to help promote better alignment. In addition, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society recommends doing exercise to help strengthen and stretch the foot and ankle and improve balance. Stronger and more flexible muscles will be less likely to pull on the ligaments. Improving balance will reduce the risk of falling and twisting the ankle or foot.

Rules for Goalkeeper in Soccer

As a soccer goalie, you must adhere to most of the same fundamental rules as the rest of the players. There are certain rules that apply only to goalkeepers, most of which relate to the fact that you are able to handle the ball with your hands inside the penalty box, whereas field players are not. You also must abide by certain equipment rules if the team or league you play in follows the Federation Internationale de Football Association, or FIFA regulations.
According to FIFA’s Laws of the Game, a goalie must wear a different color uniform that distinguishes you from the rest of your team, as well as the opposing team and referees. Just like field players, goalies must wear appropriate stockings, shin guards and soccer cleats. Jewelry is not allowed.
As a goalkeeper, you are allowed to handle the ball with your hands within your penalty area. You can catch any ball that is shot, headed or passed by the opposing team within this area. You also can handle the ball after it has touched one of your teammates, as long as the ball was not deliberately passed to you. In some cases, it is unclear if the ball is passed, at which point the referee makes a judgment call. If a teammate passes the ball, you must dribble the ball first and gain control. Only thereafter can you pick up the ball. You may not handle a ball from a teammate’s throw-in; but a ball that is headed to you by a teammate can be handled. You can distribute the ball back into play after gaining control of it by throwing or kicking it. If you throw the ball and it remains in the penalty area, you cannot handle the ball again. You have six seconds to distribute the ball from the moment you gain control. If you deliberately take more time, you may receive a verbal warning from the referee and a yellow card caution on subsequent infractions.
When the ball is kicked out of bounds past the goal line by the opposing team, a goal kick is awarded to your team. In general, the goalie takes the goal kick but is not required to. If you take the goal kick, you can place the ball anywhere along the 6-yard box line — the smaller box inside of the penalty area. Once the ball is kicked, if it by chance remains inside of the penalty area, you are not allowed to handle it.
Though goalkeepers receive a little more leeway from referees when defending, a goalie can commit a foul just like field players. If you intentionally impede an attacker from moving about the pitch, either by tripping, pushing or pulling on his jersey, a referee can call you for a foul. If the foul occurs within the penalty area, you may receive a yellow or red card, depending on the severity of the foul. If a foul is given within the penalty area, a penalty kick is awarded to the opposing team.
Goalies are allowed to come out of their penalty area and participate in field play. Once you leave your penalty area, you are no longer allowed to handle the ball. Certain game situations lend themselves to the goalie leaving his penalty area. This is common during close game situations when a goal is needed to tie or win the game. One instance you might come out of your penalty area to support the rest of your team in the opposing team’s penalty area is during a corner kick.
You must remain on the goal line between the goal posts before the ball is kicked during a penalty kick. Once the ball is kicked, you can move your body forward in an effort to cut down the shooting angle. As a goalie, you also may take penalty kicks if one is awarded to your team.